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01-Dec-2016 11:04 by 5 Comments

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In May 2013, leading up to the 13th Malaysian General Election, there were reports of access to You Tube videos critical of the Barisan National Government and to pages of Pakatan Rakyat political leaders in Facebook being blocked.Analysis of the network traffic showed that ISPs were scanning the headers and actively blocking requests for the videos and Facebook pages.

Censorship guidelines for local movie productions were only slightly eased in March 2010 to allow LGBT characters who could only portray their sexual orientation through hugging the same sex., a number of websites critical of the Malaysian Government had been pulled off.In 2016, Malaysia was ranked 146th (out of 180) in the Worldwide Press Freedom Index by Reporters Without Borders.Prime Ministers Abdullah Badawi and Najib Razak, on many occasions, have pledged that Internet access in Malaysia will not be censored and that it is up to parents to install their own censorship software and provide education to their children (provide self-censorship).The ISPs also actively deny that there are Internet filters in place when asked.Any act that curbs internet freedom is theoretically contrary to the Multimedia Act signed by the government of Malaysia in the 1990s.

However, pervasive state controls on traditional media spill over to the Internet at times, leading to self-censorship and reports that the state investigates and harasses bloggers and cyber-dissidents.He reiterated that the main objective of the code was to build a better "Bangsa Malaysia".On the current film censorship guidelines, he said that if a scene was "too sexy", then the scene would be axed. They watch the scene and if it's too glaring then they will cut it.In August 2008, the Sisters in Islam (SIS), an Islamic organisation in Malaysia, was surprised to find that a book published in 2005 featuring a compilation of research papers was banned by the Home Ministry of Malaysia.SIS research and publications programme manager Masjaliza Hamzah said that activists and academics from Southeast Asia and the Middle East contributed to the book in 2003 and that it mainly focused on challenges Muslim women faced in their countries.Concerns have been raised over the board's political neutrality, as it is under the control of the Malaysian home office.