Non liquidating

23-Oct-2017 10:59 by 6 Comments

Non liquidating - dating norms in france

Then, in June 2016, the State Duma adopted a series of laws known collectively as the Yarovaya Law.

The part of the Yarovaya Law that has received much less attention is the provision imposing new restrictions on missionary work.

And a recent Supreme Court decision has opened the door to liquidating Jehovah’s Witnesses communities in Russia.

Russia divides all faiths into “traditional” and “nontraditional.” This concept, while absent from the Russian Law on Religious Freedom (although mentioned in the law’s preamble), has been introduced under pressure from the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC) and Patriarch Kirill personally.

The campaign against Jehovah’s Witnesses began in 2009, during the still relatively liberal Dmitry Medvedev’s premiership.

In a number of cases the courts, relying on poorly and unprofessionally conducted evaluations, concluded that Jehovah’s Witnesses’ literature could be defined as “extremist,” referring as it did to the faith as the only true faith.

Orthodox Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Buddhism are deemed “traditional,” while Old Believers, Catholics, various Protestant denominations, and many others are not.

A member of the 'Union of Orthodox Banner-Bearers' takes part in a demonstration against the movie 'Matilda' in front of the Church of the Resurrection in Moscow on August 1, 2017.Today there are some 15 million practicing Orthodox believers in Russia, 10 million Muslims, 3 million Protestants, 500,000 Buddhists, 200,000 Jews, 175,000 Jehovah’s Witnesses, 100,000 Hindus, and 100,000 followers of other religious faiths (e.g., there are an estimated 10,000 Mormons in Russia).The ROC has usurped the right to a close relationship with the government and accuses Catholics and Protestants of proselytizing in the territory that it considers its own.Furthermore, the law on meetings and demonstrations was also tightened.And in 2015 a new directive was introduced specifying that all religious groups must inform authorities of their existence.(There are more than 2,000 groups engaged in this activity in Russia.)On top of that, because Jehovah’s Witnesses organizations are now judged “extremist,” the state is confiscating the profession’s assets: 118 buildings in fifty-seven regions whose total value is 1.9 billion rubles. It is clear in advance that the judgment won’t be in Russia’s favor.