Radiocarbon dating and the prehistoric archaeology of china

14-Sep-2016 06:23 by 4 Comments

Radiocarbon dating and the prehistoric archaeology of china

The Terminal Pleistocene warming was interrupted by the Younger Dryas ca. Although the Younger Dryas is seen in other regions as a generally cold and dry period, in South China the main effect of the Younger Dryas was probably the sudden onset of greater seasonality.Understanding the local impact of the Younger Dryas on the basin of the Yangzi River and in particular in the limestone region south of the main river channel is still not possible (20).

A taxonomic and taphonomic study of the fauna was also carried out (26).Here we report on the radiocarbon ages of the sediments based on analyses of charcoal and bone collagen.The best-preserved charcoal and bone samples were identified by prescreening in the field and laboratory.Numerous caves in the vast karstic landscape of the southern area of the Yangzi River basin of China are known to have been inhabited by hunter-gatherer groups during the Late Pleistocene and early Holocene.The generally good preservation of the cave deposits and the presence of rich archaeological assemblages, including stone, bone, and shell tools, have led to a large number of excavations since the 1980s.Y.), who uncovered 2 clusters of potsherds indicating the presence of 2 vessels (Fig. A piece of charcoal closely associated with the potsherds was dated to 16,700–15,850 cal BP and organic residue from the ceramic to 17,750–16,900 cal BP (7, 16, 17, 25;) (Table 1).

The pottery was coarsely made, with thick, uneven walls up to 2 cm thick, and was fired at low temperatures.Yuchanyan Cave in Daoxian County, Hunan Province (People's Republic of China), yielded fragmentary remains of 2 or more ceramic vessels, in addition to large amounts of ash, a rich animal bone assemblage, cobble and flake artifacts, bone tools, and shell tools.The artifacts indicate that the cave was a Late Paleolithic foragers' camp.While similarly well-preserved Late Pleistocene cave sites are found in other regions of the world, the cave sites in this region of South China (as well as several sites in neighboring Japan and the Russian Far East) are unique due to the presence of ceramic vessels in their otherwise Late Paleolithic assemblages.Among the well-known sites in China from this period are Xianrendong and Diaotonghuan in Jiangxi Province (1–15), indicating that the world's first pottery was produced in East Asia.Secondly, accurate and precise radiocarbon dating of these sites in the past has proven to be difficult.