Radiometric dating and the age of the earth

29-Jul-2016 20:22 by 6 Comments

Radiometric dating and the age of the earth - bj novak dating 2016

They concluded that the helium in the rock was 100,000 times more plentiful than it should have been if the rocks were really 1.5 billion years old.

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For example, a worldwide flood would uproot and bury preflood forests.Radiocarbon ages do not increase steadily with depth, as one might expect. In other words, the concentration of carbon-14 is unexpectedly low in the lower organic layers.As one moves to higher and higher layers, this concentration increases, but at a decreasing rate.When a living thing dies, its radiocarbon loss (decay) is no longer balanced by intake, so its radiocarbon steadily decreases with a half-life of 5,730 years.If we knew the amount of carbon-14 in an organism when it died, we could attempt to date the time of death.However, for the last 3,500 years, the increase in the ratio has been extremely slight.

Radiocarbon dating of vertical sequences of organic-rich layers at 714 locations worldwide has consistently shown a surprising result.

Cosmic radiation striking the upper atmosphere converts about 21 pounds of nitrogen each year into radiocarbon (carbon-14).

Most carbon-14 quickly combines with oxygen to form radioactive carbon dioxide, which then spreads throughout the atmosphere.

If the atmosphere's ratio of carbon-14 to carbon-12 has doubled since the flood and we did not know it, radiocarbon ages of things living soon after the flood would appear to be one half-life (or 5,730 years) older than their true ages.

If that ratio quadrupled, organic remains would appear 11,460 (2 x 5,730) years older, etc.

When granite rock hardens, it freezes radioactive elements in place.